Get Intimate with Your Watershed

Delivered by Wildsight, the Trust’s Know Your Watershed program teaches grade eight students where their community’s water comes from, how it’s treated and where it goes—and has reached almost 3,100 students in 74 Basin schools since 2010. Last year, after completing the program’s field trip and classroom components, the students at Rossland’s Seven Summits Centre for Learning undertook an additional challenge. Through Lego, they explored their local water’s journey from its headwaters to the Columbia River. As a result, students and community members walked away with renewed appreciation of H20 as a key contributor to environment and health.


Entrepreneurs in the Making

You’re never too young to start thinking about becoming an entrepreneur. But how can youth who want to set out on their own get the skills they need to succeed? JA British Columbia (JABC) empowers youth across the province to build knowledge about entrepreneurship, financial literacy and work readiness. The Trust has partnered with JABC to expand their business education programming in the Basin.

These programs are delivered in local schools by enthusiastic volunteers from the business community, and focus on subjects like creating a business plan, understanding money management and making long-term career choices. By helping youth build skills like these, this partnership brings the Trust one step closer to achieving its goals of supporting youth entrepreneurship and a broader entrepreneurial culture—and it brings youth one step closer to entering the business world on their own.

Entrepreneurs in the Making
Entrepreneurs in the Making

Camp Revamp

To enhance the camper experience while increasing sustainability, Burton Historical Park and Campground, on the shores of Arrow Lakes Reservoir, recently underwent a sizeable revamp. Thanks to community volunteers, donations and funding from the Trust, the campground now features upgraded power and water service, improved landscaping and a gazebo that invites campers to settle back and soak in the surroundings. Campground revenues will fund additional projects into the future, ensuring the continued operation of this popular space.

Camp revamp
Camp revamp

The Jewel of Rossland, Restored

Built in the Late 1800s, Rossland Miners Union Hall functioned as the city’s arts centre and community hall—but, as one of the province’s oldest miners union halls, the space needs some additional care. The City of Rossland, in partnership with the Rossland Council for Arts and Culture and Heritage BC, has received support from the Trust and Columbia Kootenay Cultural Alliance to significantly renovate and restore the hall. Upgrades include detailed preservation work to the building’s facade, a new roof, fresh paint, upgrades to the fire and safety systems and conversion of the large attic into community space.


A Home for the Berrys

Habitat for Humanity helps low-income families realize a dream they might not otherwise achieve: home ownership. In summer 2014, the organization’s South East British Columbia Society constructed its first home in Cranbrook. The home recipients, the six-member Berry family, were overwhelmed by the number of businesses and individuals that stepped up to donate goods, services, labour, materials and financial support—including the Trust. The Trust is now continuing its partnership with Habitat for Humanity to pursue more projects that increase affordable housing in the Basin.

A home for the Berrys
A home for the Berrys

Roundhouse Reimagined

The Ktunaxa Nation is strengthening its presence in our region thanks to its roundhouse initiative, partially funded by the Trust. The Ktunaxa Nation Roundhouse, located at the Lower Kootenay Band (yaqan nukiy), is a contemporary reimagining of traditional “big lodges.” Considered a powerhouse of energy and culture, the roundhouse will teach First Nations traditions, host celebrations and ceremonies, and preserve the rich art and identity of the Ktunaxa Nation.